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First Code Uploaded

First Code Uploaded

From:
Devon Weller
Date:
2013-05-02 @ 13:00
I've pushed the first code to the github repository:

https://github.com/deweller/PHPCodeIntel


I'm still working toward the v0.1 proof of concept, but it is not there 
yet.  But there is enough here to see the architecture of the plugin and 
to try it out.

More details are in the readme.


Feel free to start hacking away at it and to create issues and pull requests.

- Devon

Re: [phpcodeintel] First Code Uploaded

From:
Grzegorz Gąsiecki
Date:
2013-05-03 @ 09:46
I have one question, why do you want to use php daemon ? What is the exact
purpose of it ?
I think the way eclipse pdt extension made it, is the best.


2013/5/2 Devon Weller <dweller@devonweller.com>

> I've pushed the first code to the github repository:
>
> https://github.com/deweller/PHPCodeIntel
>
>
> I'm still working toward the v0.1 proof of concept, but it is not there
> yet.  But there is enough here to see the architecture of the plugin and to
> try it out.
>
> More details are in the readme.
>
>
> Feel free to start hacking away at it and to create issues and pull
> requests.
>
> - Devon
>
>

Re: [phpcodeintel] First Code Uploaded

From:
Devon Weller
Date:
2013-05-03 @ 11:48
The PHP Daemon scans projects and parses PHP code to create the 
completions database.  It also serves the suggested completions to 
Sublime.

I could do the same thing as a new php script subprocess in Sublime for 
every request.

The reason for using a daemon is performance.  Sending a request over a 
socket to an already running PHP daemon is much faster than starting up a 
new PHP script for every lookup query.


I don't know anything about the eclipse PDT extension.  What is good about it?


On May 3, 2013, at 4:46 AM, "Grzegorz Gąsiecki" <golaod@gmail.com> wrote:

> I have one question, why do you want to use php daemon ? What is the 
exact purpose of it ?
> I think the way eclipse pdt extension made it, is the best.
> 
> 
> 2013/5/2 Devon Weller <dweller@devonweller.com>
> I've pushed the first code to the github repository:
> 
> https://github.com/deweller/PHPCodeIntel
> 
> 
> I'm still working toward the v0.1 proof of concept, but it is not there 
yet.  But there is enough here to see the architecture of the plugin and 
to try it out.
> 
> More details are in the readme.
> 
> 
> Feel free to start hacking away at it and to create issues and pull requests.
> 
> - Devon
> 
> 

Re: [phpcodeintel] First Code Uploaded

From:
Grzegorz Gąsiecki
Date:
2013-05-03 @ 13:07
PDT extension is simple one file which contains standard php function and
class definitions, also contains php doc support which is responsible for
autocompletition, building hierarchy.

Of course using daemon increases performance, but I think using Sublime API
to read files should be faster than php. If I'm wrong, correct me.


2013/5/3 Devon Weller <dweller@devonweller.com>

>
> The PHP Daemon scans projects and parses PHP code to create the
> completions database.  It also serves the suggested completions to Sublime.
>
> I could do the same thing as a new php script subprocess in Sublime for
> every request.
>
> The reason for using a daemon is performance.  Sending a request over a
> socket to an already running PHP daemon is much faster than starting up a
> new PHP script for every lookup query.
>
>
> I don't know anything about the eclipse PDT extension.  What is good about
> it?
>
>
> On May 3, 2013, at 4:46 AM, "Grzegorz Gąsiecki" <golaod@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> I have one question, why do you want to use php daemon ? What is the exact
> purpose of it ?
> I think the way eclipse pdt extension made it, is the best.
>
>
> 2013/5/2 Devon Weller <dweller@devonweller.com>
>
>> I've pushed the first code to the github repository:
>>
>> https://github.com/deweller/PHPCodeIntel
>>
>>
>> I'm still working toward the v0.1 proof of concept, but it is not there
>> yet.  But there is enough here to see the architecture of the plugin and to
>> try it out.
>>
>> More details are in the readme.
>>
>>
>> Feel free to start hacking away at it and to create issues and pull
>> requests.
>>
>> - Devon
>>
>>
>
>

Re: [phpcodeintel] First Code Uploaded

From:
Devon Weller
Date:
2013-05-03 @ 13:39
That is good to know about the PDT extension.  Since it is written in 
Java, it is not something that I would be able to use.  I don't know if it
is feasible to integrate this into Sublime, but it is not something I have
any desire to do.  Maybe someone else can tackle that project.

Regarding using Sublime API to read files:

The first version of the plugin uses a flat file.  But I am moving to 
SQLite3 for the lookups.  The reason is that a completion lookup will 
eventually be specific to the class you are typing a method on.  So, there
could be 1000 method names in the database, but only 20 of those may apply
to the instance of the class you are working with.  In this case, I think 
a round trip to the PHP daemon using SQLite to lookup method names on only
that class will beat a flat file scan of 1000 method names.

Ideally Sublime would hit the SQLite3 database directly.  But when I 
looked into using SQLite3 for python in sublime it appeared that there 
were significant issues, so I didn't try it for now.


On May 3, 2013, at 8:07 AM, "Grzegorz Gąsiecki" <golaod@gmail.com> wrote:

> PDT extension is simple one file which contains standard php function 
and class definitions, also contains php doc support which is responsible 
for autocompletition, building hierarchy.
> 
> Of course using daemon increases performance, but I think using Sublime 
API to read files should be faster than php. If I'm wrong, correct me.
> 
> 
> 2013/5/3 Devon Weller <dweller@devonweller.com>
> 
> The PHP Daemon scans projects and parses PHP code to create the 
completions database.  It also serves the suggested completions to 
Sublime.
> 
> I could do the same thing as a new php script subprocess in Sublime for 
every request.
> 
> The reason for using a daemon is performance.  Sending a request over a 
socket to an already running PHP daemon is much faster than starting up a 
new PHP script for every lookup query.
> 
> 
> I don't know anything about the eclipse PDT extension.  What is good about it?
> 
> 
> On May 3, 2013, at 4:46 AM, "Grzegorz Gąsiecki" <golaod@gmail.com> wrote:
> 
>> I have one question, why do you want to use php daemon ? What is the 
exact purpose of it ?
>> I think the way eclipse pdt extension made it, is the best.
>> 
>> 
>> 2013/5/2 Devon Weller <dweller@devonweller.com>
>> I've pushed the first code to the github repository:
>> 
>> https://github.com/deweller/PHPCodeIntel
>> 
>> 
>> I'm still working toward the v0.1 proof of concept, but it is not there
yet.  But there is enough here to see the architecture of the plugin and 
to try it out.
>> 
>> More details are in the readme.
>> 
>> 
>> Feel free to start hacking away at it and to create issues and pull requests.
>> 
>> - Devon
>> 
>> 
> 
> 

Re: [phpcodeintel] First Code Uploaded

From:
Grzegorz Gąsiecki
Date:
2013-05-03 @ 15:00
Ok, now I understand all of your choices after I read more about st api and
its possibilities.


2013/5/3 Devon Weller <dweller@devonweller.com>

>
> That is good to know about the PDT extension.  Since it is written in
> Java, it is not something that I would be able to use.  I don't know if it
> is feasible to integrate this into Sublime, but it is not something I have
> any desire to do.  Maybe someone else can tackle that project.
>
> Regarding using Sublime API to read files:
>
> The first version of the plugin uses a flat file.  But I am moving to
> SQLite3 for the lookups.  The reason is that a completion lookup will
> eventually be specific to the class you are typing a method on.  So, there
> could be 1000 method names in the database, but only 20 of those may apply
> to the instance of the class you are working with.  In this case, I think a
> round tr ip to the PHP daemon using SQLite to lookup method names on only
> that class will beat a flat file scan of 1000 method names.
>
> Ideally Sublime would hit the SQLite3 database directly.  But when I
> looked into using SQLite3 for python in sublime it appeared that there were
> significant issues, so I didn't try it for now.
>
>
> On May 3, 2013, at 8:07 AM, "Grzegorz Gąsiecki" <golaod@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> PDT extension is simple one file which contains standard php function and
> class definitions, also contains php doc support which is responsible for
> autocompletition, building hierarchy.
>
> Of course using daemon increases performance, but I think using Sublime
> API to read files should be faster than php. If I'm wrong, correct me.
>
>
> 2013/5/3 Devon Weller <dweller@devonweller.com>
>
>>
>> The PHP Daemon scans projects and parses PHP code to create the
>> completions database.  It also serves the suggested completions to Sublime.
>>
>> I could do the same thing as a new php script subprocess in Sublime for
>> every request.
>>
>> The reason for using a daemon is performance.  Sending a request over a
>> socket to an already running PHP daemon is much faster than starting up a
>> new PHP script for every lookup query.
>>
>>
>> I don't know anything about the eclipse PDT extension.  What is good
>> about it?
>>
>>
>> On May 3, 2013, at 4:46 AM, "Grzegorz Gąsiecki" <golaod@gmail.com> wrote:
>>
>> I have one question, why do you want to use php daemon ? What is the
>> exact purpose of it ?
>> I think the way eclipse pdt extension made it, is the best.
>>
>>
>> 2013/5/2 Devon Weller <dweller@devonweller.com>
>>
>>> I've pushed the first code to the github repository:
>>>
>>> https://github.com/deweller/PHPCodeIntel
>>>
>>>
>>> I'm still working toward the v0.1 proof of concept, but it is not there
>>> yet.  But there is enough here to see the architecture of the plugin and to
>>> try it out.
>>>
>>> More details are in the readme.
>>>
>>>
>>> Feel free to start hacking away at it and to create issues and pull
>>> requests.
>>>
>>> - Devon
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>
>

Re: [phpcodeintel] First Code Uploaded

From:
Stefano F. Rausch
Date:
2013-05-03 @ 19:30
I will start to look into your code on Sunday Devon.

In the meantime, I have submitted my first PR regarding the 
http://editorconfig.org file supported by ST via the 
https://github.com/sindresorhus/editorconfig-sublime plugin. Consistency 
re the coding style to apply should be as "painless" as possible. The 
addition is nice to have.

-- Stefano


On 03 May 2013, at 17:00, Grzegorz Gąsiecki <golaod@gmail.com> wrote:

Ok, now I understand all of your choices after I read more about st api 
and its possibilities.


2013/5/3 Devon Weller <dweller@devonweller.com>

That is good to know about the PDT extension.  Since it is written in 
Java, it is not something that I would be able to use.  I don't know if it
is feasible to integrate this into Sublime, but it is not something I have
any desire to do.  Maybe someone else can tackle that project.

Regarding using Sublime API to read files:

The first version of the plugin uses a flat file.  But I am moving to 
SQLite3 for the lookups.  The reason is that a completion lookup will 
eventually be specific to the class you are typing a method on.  So, there
could be 1000 method names in the database, but only 20 of those may apply
to the instance of the class you are working with.  In this case, I think 
a round tr ip to the PHP daemon using SQLite to lookup method names on 
only that class will beat a flat file scan of 1000 method names.

Ideally Sublime would hit the SQLite3 database directly.  But when I 
looked into using SQLite3 for python in sublime it appeared that there 
were significant issues, so I didn't try it for now.


On May 3, 2013, at 8:07 AM, "Grzegorz Gąsiecki" <golaod@gmail.com> wrote:

> PDT extension is simple one file which contains standard php function 
and class definitions, also contains php doc support which is responsible 
for autocompletition, building hierarchy.
> 
> Of course using daemon increases performance, but I think using Sublime 
API to read files should be faster than php. If I'm wrong, correct me.
> 
> 
> 2013/5/3 Devon Weller <dweller@devonweller.com>
> 
> The PHP Daemon scans projects and parses PHP code to create the 
completions database.  It also serves the suggested completions to 
Sublime.
> 
> I could do the same thing as a new php script subprocess in Sublime for 
every request.
> 
> The reason for using a daemon is performance.  Sending a request over a 
socket to an already running PHP daemon is much faster than starting up a 
new PHP script for every lookup query.
> 
> 
> I don't know anything about the eclipse PDT extension.  What is good about it?
> 
> 
> On May 3, 2013, at 4:46 AM, "Grzegorz Gąsiecki" <golaod@gmail.com> wrote:
> 
>> I have one question, why do you want to use php daemon ? What is the 
exact purpose of it ?
>> I think the way eclipse pdt extension made it, is the best.
>> 
>> 
>> 2013/5/2 Devon Weller <dweller@devonweller.com>
>> I've pushed the first code to the github repository:
>> 
>> https://github.com/deweller/PHPCodeIntel
>> 
>> 
>> I'm still working toward the v0.1 proof of concept, but it is not there
yet.  But there is enough here to see the architecture of the plugin and 
to try it out.
>> 
>> More details are in the readme.
>> 
>> 
>> Feel free to start hacking away at it and to create issues and pull requests.
>> 
>> - Devon
>> 
>> 
> 
> 


Re: [phpcodeintel] First Code Uploaded

From:
Grzegorz Gąsiecki
Date:
2013-05-05 @ 06:20
https://github.com/Kronuz/SublimeCodeIntel


2013/5/3 Stefano F. Rausch <stefano@rausch-e.net>

> I will start to look into your code on Sunday Devon.
>
> In the meantime, I have submitted my first PR regarding the
> http://editorconfig.org file supported by ST via the
> https://github.com/sindresorhus/editorconfig-sublime plugin. Consistency
> re the coding style to apply should be as "painless" as possible. The
> addition is nice to have.
>
> -- Stefano
>
>
> On 03 May 2013, at 17:00, Grzegorz Gąsiecki <golaod@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> Ok, now I understand all of your choices after I read more about st api
> and its possibi lities.
>
>
> 2013/5/3 Devon Weller <dweller@devonweller.com>
>
>>
>> That is good to know about the PDT extension.  Since it is written in
>> Java, it is not something that I would be able to use.  I don't know if it
>> is feasible to integrate this into Sublime, but it is not something I have
>> any desire to do.  Maybe someone else can tackle that project.
>>
>> Regarding using Sublime API to read files:
>>
>> The first version of the plugin uses a flat file.  But I am moving to
>> SQLite3 for the lookups.  The reason is that a completion lookup will
>> eventually be specific to the class you are typing a method on.  So, there
>> could be 1000 method names in the database, but only 20 of those may apply
>> to the instance of the class you are working with.  In this case, I think a
>> round tr ip to the PHP daemon using SQLite to lookup method names on only
>> that class will beat a flat file scan of 1000 method names.
>>
>> Ideally Sublime would hit the SQLite3 database directly.  But when I
>> looked into using SQLite3 for python in sublime it appeared that there were
>> significant issues, so I didn't try it for now.
>>
>>
>> On May 3, 2013, at 8:07 AM, "Grzegorz Gąsiecki" <golaod@gmail.com> wrote:
>>
>> PDT extension is simple one file which contains standard php function and
>> class definitions, also contains php doc support which is responsible for
>> autocompletition, building hierarchy.
>>
>> Of course using daemon increases performance, but I think using Sublime
>> API to read files should be faster than php. If I'm wrong, correct me.
>>
>>
>> 2013/5/3 Devon Weller <dweller@devonweller.com>
>>
>>>
>>> The PHP Daemon scans projects and parses PHP code to create the
>>> completions database.  It also serves the suggested completions to Sublime.
>>>
>>> I could do the same thing as a new php script subprocess in Sublime for
>>> every request.
>>>
>>> The reason for using a daemon is performance.  Sending a request over a
>>> socket to an already running PHP daemon is much faster than starting up a
>>> new PHP script for every lookup query.
>>>
>>>
>>> I don't know anything about the eclipse PDT extension.  What is good
>>> about it?
>>>
>>>
>>> On May 3, 2013, at 4:46 AM, "Grzegorz Gąsiecki" <golaod@gmail.com>
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>> I have one question, why do you want to use php daemon ? What is the
>>> exact purpose of it ?
>>> I think the way eclipse pdt extension made it, is the best.
>>>
>>>
>>> 2013/5/2 Devon Weller <dweller@devonweller.com>
>>>
>>>> I've pushed the first code to the github repository:
>>>>
>>>> https://github.com/deweller/PHPCodeIntel
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> I'm still working toward the v0.1 proof of concept, but it is not there
>>>> yet.  But there is enough here to see the architecture of the plugin and to
>>>> try it out.
>>>>
>>>> More details are in the readme.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Feel free to start hacking away at it and to create issues and pull
>>>> requests.
>>>>
>>>> - Devon
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>
>

Re: [phpcodeintel] First Code Uploaded

From:
Devon Weller
Date:
2013-05-05 @ 12:51
I use SublimeCodeIntel every day.

It works, but it is missing a couple of key features for me.  And it does 
not seem to have had a major release in 2 years.

It does do:

+ Intelligent Automatic Class completions
+ Resolves inherited methods
+ Supports constants
+ Supports static methods (kind of - does not differentiate)


It does not do:

- Full method signatures (including parameters)
- Differentiate between static and public method calls (e.g. MyClass:: and
$my_class_instance-> both trigger the same list of methods)

For me, the deal breaker is the missing method signatures.


I'm sure a good argument could be made to fork SublimeCodeIntel and update
it's python code.  But for me, I want a plugin written primarily in PHP so
the PHP community can more easily extend and modify it.

- Devon


On May 5, 2013, at 1:20 AM, "Grzegorz Gąsiecki" <golaod@gmail.com> wrote:

> https://github.com/Kronuz/SublimeCodeIntel
> 
> 
> 2013/5/3 Stefano F. Rausch <stefano@rausch-e.net>
> I will start to look into your code on Sunday Devon.
> 
> In the meantime, I have submitted my first PR regarding the 
http://editorconfig.org file supported by ST via the 
https://github.com/sindresorhus/editorconfig-sublime plugin. Consistency 
re the coding style to apply should be as "painless" as possible. The 
addition is nice to have.
> 
> -- Stefano
> 
> 
> On 03 May 2013, at 17:00, Grzegorz Gąsiecki <golaod@gmail.com> wrote:
> 
> Ok, now I understand all of your choices after I read more about st api 
and its possibi lities.
> 
> 
> 2013/5/3 Devon Weller <dweller@devonweller.com>
> 
> That is good to know about the PDT extension.  Since it is written in 
Java, it is not something that I would be able to use.  I don't know if it
is feasible to integrate this into Sublime, but it is not something I have
any desire to do.  Maybe someone else can tackle that project.
> 
> Regarding using Sublime API to read files:
> 
> The first version of the plugin uses a flat file.  But I am moving to 
SQLite3 for the lookups.  The reason is that a completion lookup will 
eventually be specific to the class you are typing a method on.  So, there
could be 1000 method names in the database, but only 20 of those may apply
to the instance of the class you are working with.  In this case, I think 
a round tr ip to the PHP daemon using SQLite to lookup method names on 
only that class will beat a flat file scan of 1000 method names.
> 
> Ideally Sublime would hit the SQLite3 database directly.  But when I 
looked into using SQLite3 for python in sublime it appeared that there 
were significant issues, so I didn't try it for now.
> 
> 
> On May 3, 2013, at 8:07 AM, "Grzegorz Gąsiecki" <golaod@gmail.com> wrote:
> 
>> PDT extension is simple one file which contains standard php function 
and class definitions, also contains php doc support which is responsible 
for autocompletition, building hierarchy.
>> 
>> Of course using daemon increases performance, but I think using Sublime
API to read files should be faster than php. If I'm wrong, correct me.
>> 
>> 
>> 2013/5/3 Devon Weller <dweller@devonweller.com>
>> 
>> The PHP Daemon scans projects and parses PHP code to create the 
completions database.  It also serves the suggested completions to 
Sublime.
>> 
>> I could do the same thing as a new php script subprocess in Sublime for
every request.
>> 
>> The reason for using a daemon is performance.  Sending a request over a
socket to an already running PHP daemon is much faster than starting up a 
new PHP script for every lookup query.
>> 
>> 
>> I don't know anything about the eclipse PDT extension.  What is good about it?
>> 
>> 
>> On May 3, 2013, at 4:46 AM, "Grzegorz Gąsiecki" <golaod@gmail.com> wrote:
>> 
>>> I have one question, why do you want to use php daemon ? What is the 
exact purpose of it ?
>>> I think the way eclipse pdt extension made it, is the best.
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 2013/5/2 Devon Weller <dweller@devonweller.com>
>>> I've pushed the first code to the github repository:
>>> 
>>> https://github.com/deweller/PHPCodeIntel
>>> 
>>> 
>>> I'm still working toward the v0.1 proof of concept, but it is not 
there yet.  But there is enough here to see the architecture of the plugin
and to try it out.
>>> 
>>> More details are in the readme.
>>> 
>>> 
>>> Feel free to start hacking away at it and to create issues and pull requests.
>>> 
>>> - Devon
>>> 
>>> 
>> 
>> 
> 
> 
> 
> 

Re: [phpcodeintel] First Code Uploaded

From:
Grzegorz Gąsiecki
Date:
2013-05-06 @ 06:08
Last night I tried to use phpcondeintel on linux, unfortunately plugin
didn't work.
Checked whether socket is enabled and can create listener ( I can ), but
daemon does not start ( without any logs ).
Will check that later, cuz I didn't have time last night for that.


2013/5/5 Devon Weller <dweller@devonweller.com>

>
> I use SublimeCodeIntel every day.
>
> It works, but it is missing a couple of key features for me.  And it does
> not seem to have had a major release in 2 years.
>
> It does do:
>
> + Intelligent Automatic Class completions
> + Resolves inherited methods
> + Supports constants
> + Supports static methods (kind of - does not differentiate)
>
>
> It does not do:
>
> - Full method signatures (including parameters)
> - Differentiate between static and public method calls (e.g. MyClass:: and
> $my_class_instance-> both trigger the same list of methods)
>
> For me, the deal breaker is the missing method sign atures.
>
>
> I'm sure a good argument could be made to fork SublimeCodeIntel and update
> it's python code.  But for me, I want a plugin written primarily in PHP so
> the PHP community can more easily extend and modify it.
>
> - Devon
>
>
> On May 5, 2013, at 1:20 AM, "Grzegorz Gąsiecki" <golaod@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> https://github.com/Kronuz/SublimeCodeIntel
>
>
> 2013/5/3 Stefano F. Rausch <stefano@rausch-e.net>
>
>> I will start to look into your code on Sunday Devon.
>>
>> In the meantime, I have submitted my first PR regarding the
>> http://editorconfig.org file supported by ST via the
>> https://github.com/sindresorhus/editorconfig-sublime plugin. Consistency
>> re the coding style to apply should be as "painless" as possible. The
>> addition is nice to have.
>>
>> -- Stefano
>>
>>
>> On 03 May 2013, at 17:00, Grzegorz Gąsiecki <golaod@gmail.com> wrote:
>>
>> Ok, now I understand all of your choices after I read more about st api
>> and its possibi lities.
>>
>>
>> 2013/5/3 Devon Weller <dweller@devonweller.com>
>>
>>>
>>> That is good to know about the PDT extension.  Since it is written in
>>> Java, it is not something that I would be able to use.  I don't know if it
>>> is feasible to integrate this into Sublime, but it is not something I have
>>> any desire to do.  Maybe someone else can tackle that project.
>>>
>>> Regarding using Sublime API to read files:
>>>
>>> The first version of the plugin uses a flat file.  But I am moving to
>>> SQLite3 for the lookups.  The reason is that a completion lookup will
>>> eventually be specific to the class you are typing a method on.  So, there
>>> could be 1000 method names in the database, but only 20 of those may apply
>>> to the instance of the class you are working with.  In this case, I think a
>>> round tr ip to the PHP daemon using SQLite to lookup method names on only
>>> that class will beat a flat file scan of 1000 method names.
>>>
>>> Ideally Sublime would hit the SQLite3 database directly.  But when I
>>> looked into using SQLite3 for python in sublime it appeared that there were
>>> significant issues, so I didn't try it for now.
>>>
>>>
>>> On May 3, 2013, at 8:07 AM, "Grzegorz Gąsiecki" <golaod@gmail.com>
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>> PDT extension is simple one file which contains standard php function
>>> and class definitions, also contains php doc support which is responsible
>>> for autocompletition, building hierarchy.
>>>
>>> Of course using daemon increases performance, but I think using Sublime
>>> API to read files should be faster than php. If I'm wrong, correct me.
>>>
>>>
>>> 2013/5/3 Devon Weller <dweller@devonweller.com>
>>>
>>>>
>>>> The PHP Daemon scans projects and parses PHP code to create the
>>>> completions database.  It also serves the suggested completions to Sublime.
>>>>
>>>> I could do the same thing as a new php script subprocess in Sublime for
>>>> every request.
>>>>
>>>> The reason for using a daemon is performance.  Sending a request over a
>>>> socket to an already running PHP daemon is much faster than starting up a
>>>> new PHP script for every lookup query.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> I don't know anything about the eclipse PDT extension.  What is good
>>>> about it?
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> On May 3, 2013, at 4:46 AM, "Grzegorz Gąsiecki" <golaod@gmail.com>
>>>> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> I have one question, why do you want to use php daemon ? What is the
>>>> exact purpose of it ?
>>>> I think the way eclipse pdt extension made it, is the best.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> 2013/5/2 Devon Weller <dweller@devonweller.com>
>>>>
>>>>> I've pushed the first code to the github repository:
>>>>>
>>>>> https://github.com/deweller/PHPCodeIntel
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> I'm still working toward the v0.1 proof of concept, but it is not
>>>>> there yet.  But there is enough here to see the architecture of the plugin
>>>>> and to try it out.
>>>>>
>>>>> More details are in the readme.
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> Feel free to start hacking away at it and to create issues and pull
>>>>> requests.
>>>>>
>>>>> - Devon
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
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